Tag: Archives

Call for Papers – ‘Publishing, Collecting and Accessing African-language Materials’

SCOLMA Annual Conference 2020

Oun a ní la ? gbé l’árug?[1] 

(It is the heritage we have that we must celebrate :

Publishing, Collecting and Accessing African-language Materials

 

Monday 8 June 2020

SALT, Paul Webley Wing, SOAS, University of London

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The question of writing in African languages has frequently been a matter of debate and contestation in recent times. Today, English, French and Portuguese remain the official languages of most countries of Africa south of the Sahara, and most publishing appears in these languages.

Nevertheless, books and newspapers continue to be published in many African languages, albeit often in small numbers. New initiatives such as the Jalada Translation Project are actively promoting writing in this area. African languages also flourish in many other formats – and have done so historically – whether (for example) as manuscripts, ephemera, or audio-visual forms from cassette tapes and radio programmes to YouTube films.

This conference will take up these issues by looking at producing, collecting, accessing, researching and preserving African-language materials.

One set of concerns for the conference are those relating to production and publishing. What is the current state of publishing of African-language books, periodicals and newspapers – and what is its history? What other formats have been vibrant in the past, and what forms are emerging today?

More generally, what forms of creativity and innovation are encouraging the production of works in African languages, and which have been successful in doing so in the past? What is the role of government policy, and of school and university education, in encouraging writing and creativity in these languages? What can we learn from the creation of literary and other works in major languages such as KiSwahili or Yoruba? For endangered languages, does publication or the creation of new work play a role in revival?

Related to this is the question of new technology, which provides new platforms and possibilities of connection, as well as enabling written communication in non-roman scripts. Is this technology making a significant difference to the future of publishing and the making of creative works in African languages? Is it a game-changer?

Libraries and archives (in Africa, the UK and internationally) tasked with collecting and preserving African-language materials are faced with specific challenges – not least the multifariousness of formats, and the fragmented nature of the book trade in Africa. What sort of historic collections do these institutions have? How and to what extent are they currently collecting printed books, and material in other formats, in African languages? How are they responding to emerging formats? How are they dealing with the linguistic challenges of processing such material? In addition to academic and national libraries, do school, college and public libraries have significant collections in this area?

Access to these collections is crucial, in particular, for mother-tongue speakers of these languages. How do potential users find out what we have, and how do libraries and archives enable access to these collections? Do current cataloguing standards and practices offer sufficient support to catalogue users? How are these collections being used by language learners and non-mother tongue speakers? How are libraries and archives outside Africa working to engage diaspora audiences, and partner with African colleagues? How are libraries in Africa promoting these materials and encouraging their use? What is happening in the field of digitisation?

 

Scope

Papers covering all African languages (including Afrikaans and Pidgins), as well as Arabic, are within scope for this conference. Papers looking at the issues above in relation to non-roman scripts are also welcomed.

Papers should relate to questions of publishing/producing works in African languages, and collecting, accessing, researching and preserving such materials. We are not looking for papers on more general themes relating to African languages.

 

How to submit an abstract for consideration

Librarians, archivists, researchers, teachers and students are invited to submit abstracts on these themes of up to 350 words, together with a short bio (one paragraph only), including current affiliation (where applicable). Please send this information to Sarah Rhodes (sarah.rhodes@bodleian.ox.ac.uk) by 3 February 2020.

 

We regret that SCOLMA is not able to offer funding for travel expenses.

 

[1] Yoruba proverb

SCOLMA Annual Conference 2019 – ‘Decolonising African Studies: questions and dilemmas for libraries, archives and collections’

Decolonising African Studies: questions and dilemmas for libraries, archives and collections

Monday, 10 June 2019, University of Edinburgh

Appleton Tower 2.12, 11 Crichton Street, Edinburgh EH8 9LE

 Programme

 9.00                Introductions

 9.05–10.20    Panel 1 – Decolonising library collections

Jenni Skinner, Mehves Dignum and Clara Panozzo Zénere (Cambridge University)

‘Decolonising library collections and practices at Cambridge University’

 

Justin Cox (African Books Collective) and Stephanie Kitchen (International African Institute)

‘African Books Collective: African published books for the North’

 

Gerard van Der Bruinhorst (African Studies Centre Library, University of Leiden)

‘On rape and revenge: reading Peggy Oppong’s “Red heifer” against the decolonisation of African Studies collections’

 

10.20–10.45 Coffee

 

10.45–12.15   Panel 2 – Decolonisation and archives in Southern Africa 

Mathias Fubah Alubafi (Human Sciences Research Council)

‘The HSRC Archives (1929–1968) in a changing South Africa’

 

Ken Chisa (University of KwaZulu-Natal)

‘Decolonising indigenous knowledge (IK) in South African archives: can policy learn from practice?

 

Livingstone Muchefa (National Archives of Zimbabwe) tbc

‘The archivist and the scholar: re-interpretation and re-location of colonial archives’

 

12.15–13.30   Lunch & AGM

 

13.30–15.00 Panel 3 – Archival histories and migrations

James Lowry (Liverpool University Centre for Archive Studies)

‘Repatriation is decolonisation’

 

Fabienne Chamelot (University of Portsmouth)

‘Splitting the colonial archives in half: archival expertise and decolonisation in West Africa, 1958–1960’

 

Isabelle Dion (Archives nationales d’outre-mer, France)

‘French decolonisation and archives’ (this paper will be delivered in French)

 

15.00–15.30 Tea

 

15.30–17.00  Panel 4 – Working with heritage collections

 Ahmed Hussein Abdelrahman Adam (University of Khartoum) tbc

‘Sudanese collections in the UK: current situation and challenges’

 

Joanne Davis

‘Accessing UK archival holdings from Africa’

 

Chimwemwe Phiri tbc

‘Unearthing new meanings: a decolonial framework for accessing and translating the Africa colonial archive at the Weston Library, University of Oxford’

 

17.00–18.00  Round table

The round table will provide an opportunity to discuss some of the issues raised during the conference in relation to the collections of major libraries and archives in the UK and internationally.

 

SCOLMA thanks ECAS, the University of Edinburgh, ASAUK and Taylor & Francis for their support of the conference.

 This programme is subject to change.

Conference fee £50 (£30 unwaged) to include tea/coffee and lunch. To book a place contact Sarah Rhodes (sarah.rhodes@bodleian.ox.ac.uk).

SCOLMA Seminar: Julie Halls on ‘Textile designs for Africa: a history in the Archives’

SCOLMA Seminar Series 2019

Julie Halls, The National Archives

‘Textile designs for Africa: a history in the Archives’

13:00 – 14:00, Monday 11th February 2019

Room S311, Paul Webley Wing, SOAS

North Block, Torrington Square, London, WC1E 7HX

BOOKING: please contact Daniel Gilfoyle

email: daniel.gilfoyle@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk

telephone 020 8876 3444


Important This site makes use of cookies which may contain tracking information about visitors. By continuing to browse this site you agree to our use of cookies.